anna RF Articles Asia Indian Music Naadistan

(Video) anna RF – Tum Hi Ho (ft. Naadistan) (Instrumental – “Aashiqui2” Soundtrack) (2014)

Israel, Asia | December 2014 | An instrumental version of one of the most popular movie songs in 2013 in India, 'Tum Hi Ho'.

Instruments used:

Saxophone, Bass, Guitar and

Kamancha

Also known as kamānche or kamāncha (Persian: کمانچه‎‎, Azerbaijani: kamança), is an Iranian bowed string instrument, used also in Azerbaijani, Turkish, and Kurdish Music and related to the rebab, the historical ancestor of the kamancheh and also to the bowed Byzantine lyra, ancestor of the European violin family. The strings are played with a variable-tension bow: the word “kamancheh” means “little bow” in Persian (kæman, bow, and -cheh, diminutive). It is widely used in the classical music of Iran, Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Kurdistan Regions with slight variations in the structure of the instrument. More on www.wikipedia.com.

Kamancha
Photo: http://www.3dsky.org

Lyra

Lyra
Photo: http://www.mim.be

The lyra is a three-stringed fiddle with a curved, pear-shaped body, cut along with the neck and the head from a single block of wood. The top has two sound holes (the ‘eyes’) shaped like half-moons. The lyra is played upright. The strings are not pressed onto the fingerboard, as with the violin, but from the side with the fingernails. Probably the lyra orginated in medieval Byzantium, from where it spread over a large part of Southeastern Europe.

Closely related fiddles with a living tradition are the  Calabrian lira, the Dalmatian lijerica, the Bulgarian gadulka and the kemençe of Ottoman art music. The lyra is also known in the Greek parts of Thracia and Maccedonia, and on some islands of the Aegean Sea. It is still particularly popular on the island of Karpathos. (see Instrument of the month of July 2012). More on www.mim.be.

Original version of the song by Arijit Singh:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s